The truth about kindergartens in the USSR.

The truth about kindergartens in the USSR. time, well, children, nothing, everything, could, soviet, I remember that, only, children, time, very, more, educators, understood, say, like, Soviet, unceremoniously

They constantly write to me here - well, here you criticizethe USSR, and he did not find him at all, in any form, only you know something from books. In fact, when the USSR collapsed, I was already in school and remembered quite well the last few years of the Union. It is quite enough for them to competently talk about the entire Soviet system - all Soviet institutions with more than two people, such as schools, kindergartens, hospitals or the army, are organized according to absolutely identical principles.
In today's post I will tell you about what a typical Soviet kindergarten was, which I went to in the eighties and in which I understood what a scoop is, and at the end of the post is a traditional interesting question. Welladd friendsDo not forget)
To begin with, Soviet kindergartens have emerged as a place where Soviet citizens can take their children while they are at work. In pre-revolutionary times, this problem was solved differently - a woman could not work and is at home with children, plus almost any urban family with average incomes could easily afford a nanny or governess.In the USSR, women were deprived of the right not to go to work (giving it the other way around, as “empowerment”), and nurseries and kindergartens were offered to children.
God saved me from the sovetsky nursery - when I was growing up, maternity leave in the USSR was already more or less decent terms, plus I had a grandmother who sat with me from time to time. According to the stories, the children in the Soviet manger did not do anything all day, just lay in their beds and shouting heart-rendingly. Those who were older were sent to kindergarten, the two senior groups of which I remembered very well.
The Soviet kindergarten, like other Soviet educational institutions, most of all resembled some kind of closed institution like a prison. The bureaucracy was in everything - from the standards in clothing to the attitude of educators to children. It was covered up by some kind of “norms”, but in fact it looked exactly like a prison and was just as perceived (in prison, by the way, there are also norms and conditions of detention).
The general atmosphere of the kindergarten, I would say so, has taught the Soviet axiom that a person is nothing, and the team is everything.
Nutrition.
They fed us very badly, almost nothing from kindergarten food was impossible to eat.In addition, the kitchen was far from the dining room, and food was brought to us invariably cold, even I would say frozen. From the menu, I remember some dark soups with floating boiled onions, ice lumps of sour cream and circles of fat. There were also cold rice boiled down to a state of paste, smelting garlic and fatty breadcrumbs, cold semolina with lumps and nasty slimy mashed potatoes.
It was very difficult to cram into yourself, and from such food we periodically vomited. Nevertheless, the caregivers strictly followed us to put it all in ourselves, berating those who do not want to eat this rubbish. I do not remember any apples, fruits, yoghurts - all this appeared already in the nineties, after the end of the USSR.
Free time.
In our free time we played in the game room, from time to time we were filled with some kind of cultural activities like dancing to the song "they want to be like dancing ducklings". It was almost impossible to refuse, no one asked your personal desire, the party said it was necessary - the Komsomol answered to eat! While learning dances, they could occasionally make fun of those who get worse.
More or less, we were left alone only on the street - both in the winter and in the summer we went for a walk. I don’t remember any more or less interesting initiative from the educators on the street - they didn’t tell us anything about the world around us, the types of trees and birds, etc. - we were simply built in pairs and led to the playground, where from time to time they shouted at those who moved away from the flock further than they should be. We always walked only inside the fenced garden perimeter, behind the fence.
The truth about kindergartens in the USSR. time, well, children, nothing, everything, could, soviet, I remember that, only, children, time, very, more, educators, understood, say, like, Soviet, unceremoniously

Lack of privacy.
Such a concept as "privacy" was completely absent in the USSR - there was not even a word for its designation in the Soviet Newspeak. This concerned different aspects of life, from households - where in the kitchen of a communal apartment they unceremoniously pushed their nose into your soup, to personal ones - where in some working group they unceremoniously pushed their nose into your personal life. It was believed that in this way “the team is sending you on the true path,” but in reality, a bunch of unhappy aunts were publicly washing the bones of a more successful companion.
In the Soviet kindergarten, too, there was no privacy, in general, it was all about what they could accuse you of the rest before the fact that there were no doors in the kindergartens in the kindergarten toilet.Periodically the teacher could unceremoniously rush in with some shouts.
I also remember such a case, Misha’s older brother made me a “toy cigarette” from the real one - he shook out the tobacco and inserted a piece of pencil inside. The teachers saw this cigarette for me and instead of asking what it was and where it was from - they spent a real prison “shmon” of my locker, shaking out things from there and shouting loudly among themselves.
Punishments
For large and small offenses in the Soviet kindergarten there was a punishment system. Children were not beaten, but from time to time they could shout, shake their shoulder noticeably or take them by the collar. Such a punishment was also popular - for a more serious offense, they could have stood in quiet shorts and a T-shirt in the middle of the game room for a quiet hour - according to the current idea of ​​savagery.
Often, punishments had an instructive role in bringing up obedience to the masses, before the very formless “collective” - “Behold, Abramovsky and Stashkevich were badly behaved today, and they don’t go for a walk. Everyone goes and they don’t. You can say - the team was set up against the individual, taught not to stand out and be like everyone else.
Educators.
Remembering the kindergarten teachers, I can’t say warm words about them - I don’t remember anything good. Our tutors were some kind of elderly aunt at the age of 50, who seemed to us, five-year-olds, quite grandmothers. I don’t remember any funny contests, interesting games, just a warm attitude - the teachers have always tried to keep a distance and remind, "who is the boss?"
Most of all I remember some particular cases. Here we have lunch, the teacher sits opposite and declares - "What are you looking at me in the mouth, eh? I eat the same thing as you!" Or a case from a drawing lesson - we were told how to draw a person correctly and that the length of the body is approximately equal to two heads. My neighbor on the table misunderstood something and drew a man with two heads - the triumphant primitive snatched a drawing from him and began to publicly mock the "stupid."
The truth about kindergartens in the USSR. time, well, children, nothing, everything, could, soviet, I remember that, only, children, time, very, more, educators, understood, say, like, Soviet, unceremoniously

Glimpses of the future.
Something changed when I was in the older group - we were given compulsory preparatory classes, in which we studied Belarusian and English, and something else. They were led by young, playful and enterprising girls, and I was surprised to see how different the attitude towards children could be.
The girls did not make us go about the ranks.Addressing the students (yes, we were already called like that), they behaved quite differently than the old female players - they looked somewhere off into the distance, over their heads, expressing their words through their teeth; the girls looked into the eyes and tried to really figure out if you learned a lesson that you could not understand and what can be done so that you understand everything well. And they communicated with children as with full-fledged adults, it was the most striking thing - it was so different from the mandative tone of sovetskie recipes.
In the older group of the kindergarten, I already read well, rather fluently shparil Belarusian poems (“Klyacha yago rakchka, tsignuts sanki z home”) and knew simple words and phrases in English, which later helped me good in school. I still do not know what kind of teachers they were and where they studied, I can say one thing - they knew for sure that we would not have to live in the USSR very soon.
Instead of an epilogue.
In the end, I would like to repeat once more the thoughts with which I started this post - kindergartens in the USSR were a full-fledged reflection of the entire Soviet system, which was built on the suppression of the individual and was based on the lack of basic civil rights among citizens, such as private property or a combination of power choice . I am very glad that at a conscious age I could smell what this system smells like - the dictatorship stinks of yesterday's pea soup, which smelled in the lobby of Soviet kindergartens. From this smell I still chill on the back.
Did you go to kindergarten in the USSR? What do you remember?
Tell us in the comments, interesting.
Photo: Gettyimages.





Related news

The truth about kindergartens in the USSR image, picture The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR The truth about kindergartens in the USSR