Myths about Lenin, in which you continue to believe.

Myths about Lenin, in which you continue to believe. Lenin, Lenin, grandfather, grandfather, everything, wrote, personality, leader, Soviet, constantly, himself, eyes, all, friends, people, people, such, kind, propaganda, general

So, friends, today there will be an interesting post about the myths about Vladimir Ulyanov (Lenin). I think it’s no secret to you that Soviet historiography has created such a great many myths - this is both the myth of Lenin's nationality, and the myth that he was an independent and brilliant philosopher, and even that he was a "grandfather" - all this is solid. myths and lies.
In today's post we will examine some of the most popular misconceptions and myths about Lenin - in which many, and perhaps you yourself, continue to believe. In general, go under the cat, it is interesting. Welladd friendsDo not forget)
1. The myth that Lenin was a "grandfather."
Myths about Lenin, in which you continue to believe.Lenin, Lenin, grandfather, grandfather, everything, wrote, personality, leader, Soviet, constantly, himself, eyes, all, friends, people, people, such, kind, propaganda, general

Practically from the first years of the Soviet years, propaganda began to create for Lenin the image of a "good grandfather." Apparently, this was to underline his wisdom - they say, such a grandfather lived all his life and in his old age he decided to bring happiness to the people with a revolution. And also the "grandfather" is such a totemic symbol of itself, an image of the archaic "leader of the tribe" who is older and wiser.To maintain this image of Lenin, always and everywhere they painted bald, with a beard and in a strict suit.
In fact, Lenin was not any “grandfather” - he died only 53 years old, which, even by those standards, was not considered old age, it was a middle-aged man in his prime. At the time of the revolution, Lenin was only 47 at all - it was practically a young man. By the way, Lenin was not a “grandfather” in the sense of the family line either — he had neither children nor grandchildren.
What is interesting is that in the days of the October revolution, Lenin did not look at all like the Soviet propaganda depicted — bald, with a goat beard and in a three-piece suit. These days Lenin was clean-shaven, wore a wig and inconspicuous working clothes, and looked like the photo in this section. Agree, it is a little similar to the canonical image of the "grandfather-revolutionary":
2. The myth of the nationality of Lenin.
Myths about Lenin, in which you continue to believe. Lenin, Lenin, grandfather, grandfather, everything, wrote, personality, leader, Soviet, constantly, himself, eyes, all, friends, people, people, such, kind, propaganda, general

In the official Soviet biography of Lenin it is written that Lenin was Russian. To put it mildly, this is not true - Lenin's father, Ilya Ulyanov (another version of the spelling of the name Ulyanin) came from a baptized Kalmyk - a people of Mongolian origin who now live in the Republic of Kalmykia.Lenin's mother, Mary by birth, had the last name Blank, and was the daughter of the Jew, Alexander Dmitrievich Blank, who converted to Orthodoxy.
In general, the fact remains that the “leader of the Russian revolution” was not Russian himself, which was hidden during Soviet times for some unknown reason. In the Soviet years there was such a biographer of the leader by the name of Shaginyan that in 1938 he published information that the Ulyanov family had Kalmyk roots. Shahinyan even praised Krupskaya for having lived with Lenin for many years. But the Politburo quickly banned this study in a special decree of August 5, 1938, and Krupskaya was reprimanded. This ruling was only canceled after 1956.
3. The myth of the "great sage."
Myths about Lenin, in which you continue to believe. Lenin, Lenin, grandfather, grandfather, everything, wrote, personality, leader, Soviet, constantly, himself, eyes, all, friends, people, people, such, kind, propaganda, general

This myth was born at the suggestion of Bonch-Bruyevich and other “biographers” of Lenin, who were constantly told stories, how Lenin locked himself in a room and spent the whole night reading and writing something there, after which he “rested and fresh” went out to tea. In the Soviet personality cult of Lenin, she constantly realized that a person who reads and writes so much simply cannot be a sage — he knows everything in the world, etc.
In fact, Lenin read not so muchand all his numerous works are nothing but an eclectic collection of ideas and ideas popular in those years, passed through the specific personality of Lenin. Later, Soviet historiography would pass it off as "a titanic work and the continuation of the ideas of the great Marx", but you can't hide the truth - there is little of the original in Lenin's works, and often he contradicts himself.
4. The myth of a self-sufficient and independent person.
Myths about Lenin, in which you continue to believe. Lenin, Lenin, grandfather, grandfather, everything, wrote, personality, leader, Soviet, constantly, himself, eyes, all, friends, people, people, such, kind, propaganda, general

Soviet propaganda portrayed pre-revolutionary Lenin as a free philosopher - he allegedly traveled to different countries, met the right people, wrote brilliant works and tried his best to bring the revolution closer.
In fact, Lenin was an unrealized and poor man — he had no good friends, and until he was 40, he lived at the expense of his mother, actually sitting on her neck. Lenin did not want to work - he was engaged in advocacy in St. Petersburg until the age of 25, but he barely had enough money even for food, he constantly wrote letters to his mother like "if you can, please send me another hundred rubles". Then Lenin completely quit his job and lived at the expense of his mother and sister. In fact, Lenin remained a big child — his mother constantly supported him with money, bought costumes, clothes, and so on.
5. The myth that Lenin was kind.
This myth also has long roots and began to be created even during the life of the leader - the phrase "good grandfather Lenin" was imposed on pioneers and young people all over the country. The children's books published pictures of Lenin, surrounded by children, and published the following stories:
“Lena has a new badge on her dress. Who's on your badge?” The children ask.
- Grandpa Lenin!
- Your grandfather?
- My! And my mother's grandfather, and fathers. And grandpa's grandpa too! And Lenin smiles because he is kind. "
After 1956 and the debunking of the personality cult of Stalin, Lenin's kindness was even more talked about — they say that everything that was bad in the Soviet power, it’s all Stalin’s business, good grandfather Lenin wanted to do everything differently.
In fact, Lenin was neither a grandfather (as it was said above), much less good-natured. Contemporaries recalled him as a dry, petty, tyrannical and vindictive man, who also had frequent mood swings - which together made friendship with Lenin impossible. Especially contemporaries of the leader noted his evil eyes.
The writer Tirnova-Williams recalled Lenin in the following way: "The evil man was Lenin. And his eyes are wolf, evil."But the Russian publicist and philosopher Nikolai Valentinov, a close friend of Lenin, recalled: “The eyes were dark, small, very ugly. The face was very mobile, often changing the expression: alert attentiveness, meditation, thorny, prickly contempt, impenetrable cold, deepest anger. In this case, Lenin's eyes were made like eyes — a rough comparison — of an evil boar. "
But George Solomon remembers that in the first post-revolutionary years he worked in the Soviet nomenclature and knew Lenin well: “Not tall, with an unpleasant, directly repulsive expression on his face ... He was a very poor speaker, without a spark of talent, he was a great demagogue. On closer acquaintance with him, you easily noticed his weak and, frankly speaking, simply disgusting sides. First of all, he was repelled by his rudeness, mixed with impassable complacency, contempt for the interlocutor and some deliberate (I can't find another word) ism ”to the interlocutor, especially the dissenter and who did not agree with him and, moreover, to the enemy weak, not resourceful, not smart.”
Lenin did not like people and believed that he could easily dispose of their lives, for this they should only be "dehumanized" by calling some word.In 1918, peasants revolted against the Soviet arbitrariness in Penza - Lenin immediately called them "fists" and wrote like this - "you need to hang (by all means hang, so that the people see) not less than notorious kulaks, rich, bloodsuckers." Further in the text of the telegram, Lenin ordered to take hostages from the families of the peasants and to take away all the property from those who would be suspected of "sympathy".
So it goes. In general, as you see, the real Lenin was far from the personality that Soviet propaganda drew to us.
Do you know any other myths about Lenin? What do you think about all this?
Write in the comments, interesting.




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